List C

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Cabasilas, Nikolaus ()
Cacciatore, Nicolò (1780 - 1841)
Cai Song Son (11. Century)
Calandrelli, Giuseppe (1749 - 1827)
Calandrelli, Ignazio (1792 - 1866)
Caldecott, John (1800 - 1849)
Calippus [Kalippos] (ca. 330 B.C.)
Callandreau, Pierre Jean Octave (1852 - )
Calvisius [Kahlwitz], Sethus (1565 - 1615)
Cameron, Alastair G. W. (1925 - )
Cameron, Robert C. (1925 - 1972)
Campani, Giuseppe (17. Century)
Campbell, Wallace William (1862 - )
Cannon, Annie Jump (1863 - 1941)
Capella, Marcianus (5. Century)
Capelli, Giovanni (1801 - 1877)
Capocci, Ernesto (1798 - 1864)
Capocci, M. ()
Carlini, Francesco [Franz] (1783 - 1862)
Carpenter, Edwin F. (1898 - 1963)
Carpenter, James (1840 - 1899)
Carrington, Richard Ch. (1826 - 1875)
Cassegrain, Laurent (1629 - 1693)
Cassini de Thury, César François (1714 - 1784)
Cassini, Giovanni Domenico [Jean Dominique] (1625 - 1712)
Cassini, Jacques (1677 - 1756)
Cassini, Jean (Jaques) Dominique Count of Thury (1748 - 1845)
Cassiodorus, Marcus Aurelius (ca. 470 - 564)
Caussin
Cavendish, Henry (1731 - 1810)
Cayley, Arthur (1821 - 1895)
Celoria, Giovanni (1842 - )
Celsius, Anders (1701 - 1744)
Cerulli, Vincenzo (1859 - 1927)
Chabrol de Murol, Michel (1777 - )
Chacornac, Jean (1823 - 1873)
Chaix, Joseph (1766 - )
Challis, James (1803 - 1862)
Chandler, Seth Carlo (1846 - )
Chandrasekhar, S. (1868 - )
Charlier, Carl Wilhelm Ludwig (1862 - 1934)
Chazelles, Matthieu de (1657 - 1710)
Chevallier, Temple (1794 - 1873)
Chicus ( - 1328)
Childrey [Childeri], Josua (1622 - 1670)
Chladni, Ernst Florenz F. (1756 - 1827)
Chrisococca, Georg ( 14. Century)
Christie, William H. M. (1845 - 1923)
Clairaut, Alexis Claude (1713 - 1765)
Clausen, Thomas (1801 - )
Clavius, Christoph (1537 - 1612)
Cleomedes (ca. 50 B.C. or later)
Clerke, Agnes Mary (1842 - 1907)
Co Cheou King (13. Century)
Coggia
Comas Solá, José [Josep] (1868 - 1937)
Common, Andrew Ainslee (1841 - 1903)
Comrie, Leslie John (1983 - )
Condamine, Charles Marie de la (1701 - 1774)
Conon [Konon] (ca. 260 B.C.)
Cooper ()
Cornu, Marie Alfred (1841 - )
Couder, André Joseph Alexandre (1897 - 1979)
Couteau, P.
Cowell, Philip Herbert (1870 - 1949)
Crommelin, Andrew Claude de la Cherois (1865 - 1939)
Crosthwaite, J.
Cunitia, Maria (1612 - 1664)
Curtis, Heber Doust (1872 - 1942)
Cusanus [Cusa, von Kues, Krebs], Nikolaus (1401 - 1464)
Cysatus, Johannes Baptista (1588 - 1657)
 
 

Cabasilas, Nikolaus ()
Cabasilas was archbishop of Thessalia and wrote a commentary on Ptolemaios ‘Almagest’, which was printed in 1550 in Basel

Cacciatore, Nicolò (1780 - 1841)
N. Cacciatore was born on the 26. January 17801  in Casteltermini. He was assistant to Piazzi between 1800 and 1826, later director of the Palermo observatory. Cacciatore made observations of the right ascension of stars which were reduced by Auwers and published by him in the ‘Astronomische Nachrichten’. Cacciatore died in Palermo on the 27. January 1841.
1 Astr. Soc.: 1770

Cai Song Son (11. Century)
Cai Song Son was a Chinese astronomer who used a gnomon to determine the inclination of the ecliptic to be 23° 30’ 45“

Calandrelli, Giuseppe (1749 - 1827)
G. Calandrelli was born in Zaragola on the 22. May 1749. He was Professor of mathematics and director of the observatory at the Collegio Romano. He died in Rome on the 24. December 1827. A list of his work is in Pogg., Vol. 1, p. 361

Calandrelli, Ignazio (1792 - 1866)
I. Calandrelli was born in Rome in 1792. He was professor of optics and astronomy in Bologna and Rome. In addition he served as director of the observatory at at Bologna (1845-1848) and from then on as director at Campidoglio in Rome until his death in 1866. He published his observations on stars, comets and planets in the ‘Atti dell’ Accademia dei Nuovi Lincei’ and in the ‘Raccolta scientifica del Palomba’.

Minor Planet (8269) Calandrelli in named in his honour.

Caldecott, John (1800 - 1849)
J. Caldecott was born around 1800 and was astronomer to the Radja of Travancore, India, from 1832 on. His observations were published in the Mem. astr. Soc., for example the ones on the great comet of 1843. He died in Trevandrum on the 16. March 1849

Calippus [Kalippos] (ca. 330 B.C.)

Callandreau, Pierre Jean Octave (1852 - )

Calvisius [Kahlwitz], Sethus (1565 - 1615)
S. Calvisius was born in Groschleben, near Sachsenburg, in 15651  and worked first as musician in Leipzig, then as Cantor in Schulpforta and from 1594 on as Cantor, chronologist and astronomer in Leipzig. His main work ‘Sethi Calvisii Opus chronologicum, ad annum 1685, continuatum etc.’ was printed in 1681 at the expense of the Duke Friedrich II. Calvisius died in Leipzig on the 24. November 1615.
1  Ch. G. Jöcher in his ‘Allg. Gelehrten Lexicon’, Leipzig 1750, gives the 21. January 1556 for his birth and 23. November 1617 as his date of death.

Cameron, Alastair G. W. (1925 - )
Alastair G. W. Cameron {1925-    }, astrophysicist and cosmogonist and currently associate director for theoretical astrophysics at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Honoured by Minor Planet (2980) Cameron.

Cameron, Robert C. (1925 - 1972)
R. C. Cameron discovered Minor Planet (1575) Winifred on 20 April 1950  at Brooklyn, Indiana.

Campani, Giuseppe (17. Century)
G. Campani was a mechanic and optician in Bologna1  and made some microscopes and telescopes. He gained reputation for the instruments he made for the Paris observatory and Dom. Cassini discovered two or four moons of Saturn with telescopes made by G. Campani. Campani also published some own observations.
1 Rome, Pogg. Vol. 1, p. 367

Campbell, Wallace William (1862 - 1938)
W.W. Campbell was born on a farm in Hancock County, Ohio, on the 11. April 1862. He received a B.Sc. in 1886 from Ann Arbor University. Between 1888 and 1891 he was Professor of mathematics at the University of Boulder, Colorado, and from 1901 until 1930 director of the Lick Observatory. During his time there he was on different expeditions to observe eclipses. He served as president of the University of California, Berkeley, between 1923 and 1930. R. G. Aitken (1864 - 1951) was his associate director at Lick during these years. Campbell was president of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, between 1931 and 1935.

A list of some of his papers is in Pogg. 5 (1925) p. 199-200, they deal mainly with radial velocitys of stars and nebula, which was one of his main tasks. Comet 1914 d was discovered by him and was named Campbell.

He received many honors from Universities and the Prix Lalande (1903, Paris), the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society (1906, London), the Draper Gold Medal (1906), the Médaille Janssen (1910, Paris) and the Bruce Medal in 1915 from the Astronomical Soc. of the Pacific.

W.W. Campbell died in Berkeley on the 14. June 1938. Minor Planet (2751) Campbell is named in his honour.

Cannon, Annie Jump (1863 - 1941)
At Harvard University she classified the spectra of about 225,000 stars for the Henry Draper Catalogue in a system of spectral
types which she had developed. She died on 13 April 1941.

A. J. Cannon is honoured by Minor Planet (1120) Cannonia and by a lunar crater.

Source: Himmelswelt 55 (1948).

Capella, Marcianus (5. Century)
M. Capella wrote a book in which he explained the celestial circles, poles, the constellations and the planets, based on the works of Eratosthenes, Hipparcos and Ptolemaios. He said, that Mercury and Venus circled the sun.

Capelli, Giovanni (1801 - 1877)
G. Capelli was born in Milano in 1801. He was astronomer at the Milano observatory and published observations of 661 star positions, beside other work, in the ephemerides of this observatory.

Capocci, Ernesto (1798 - 1864)
E. Capocci was born in 1798 in Picinisco. Between 1819 and 1833 he was observer at and then until 1864 director of the observatory in Caopdimonte. He worked on Hora XVIII of the Berlin Celestial Maps. Capocci’s works were published in Italian and German magazines. He died in Napoli in 1864.

Capocci, M. ()
M. Capocci, director of the Naples observatory.

Carlini, Francesco [Franz] (1783 - 1862)
F. Carlini was born in Milano on the 8. January 17831  and was director of the local observatory. He calculated the Milano Ephemerides from 1804 on, the elements of comet 1862 II and, together with G. Plana, did some research on the motion of the Moon.. He died in Crodo in 1862 and left 144 scientific papers.
1 J. Cantù: 7. June 1783

Carpenter, Edwin F. (1898 - 1963)
Minor Planet (1852) Carpenter in named in his honour.

Carpenter, James (1840 - 1899)

Carrington, Richard Ch. (1826 - 1875)

Cassegrain , Laurent (1629 - 1693)1
1 see: Baranne, A. and Launay, F. in: Journal of Optic 28 (1997) 158-172

Cassini de Thury, César François (1714 - 1784)
C. F. Cassini de Thury was the son of Jaques Cassini and born in Paris on the 17. June 1714. He followed his father as director of the Paris observatory between 1756 and 1784. He began the topographic and trigonometric survey of France. This work was published as ‘Cassini’s Map of France’. He died in Paris in 1784.

Cassini, Giovanni Domenico [Jean Dominique] (1625 - 1712)
G. D. Cassini was born on the 8. June 1625 in Perinaldo, near Nice. From 1650 on he was Professor of astronomy at the University of Bologna, member of the Acad. d. Sciences in Paris and from 1669 on, on an invitation of King Ludwig XIV., director of the observatory in Paris which was erected between 1667 and 1672.

He calculated the ephemerides for the comets of the years 1664 and 1665 and the rotational period of the planet Jupiter. Cassini named the light, which was seen by Kepler and Childrey in the plane of the ecliptic, the zodiacal light and found four moons of Saturn, namely Japetus (1671), Rhea (1672), Tethys and Dione (1684). The moons were dicovered with tubeless telescopes made by G. Campani, the design was introduced by Ch. Huygens.

G. D. Cassini died on the 14. September 17121 in Paris.
1 Devic, in his ‘Hist. de la vie etc. de Cassini’, Paris 1851, gives the 11. September.

Cassini, Jacques (1677 - 1756)
J. Cassini was the son of Giovanni Domenico and born in Paris on the 18. February 1677. He followed his father as director of the Paris observatory between 1712 and 1756. J. Cassini presented the Academy a major work on the distance of stars, the inclination of the planet orbits, the orbits of Saturn’s moons and the position of Saturn’s ring. He died in Thury on the 16. April 17561.
1 Devic, in his ‘Hist. de la vie etc. de Cassini’, Paris 1851, gives the 8. February 1677 and the 18. April 1756, respectively.

Cassini, Jean (Jaques) Dominique Count of Thury (1748 - 1845)
J. D. Cassini was the son of César François and born in Paris on the 30. June 1748 and director of the Paris observatory between 1784 and 1793, when he was thrown into jail. He finished the topographic and trigonometric survey of France after 1799. He had to leave Paris in 1794 for his opposition against the Republique. He died in Thury on the 18. October 1845. His son, Alexandre Henri Gabriel, studied law and was the last Count of Thury

Cassiodorus, Marcus Aurelius (ca. 470 - 564)
M. A. Cassiodorus wrote major work on arithmetics, music, geometry and astronomy. He declared the astrology as irreligious and contrary to reason

Caussin

Cavendish, Henry (1731 - 1810)
H. Cavendish was born in Nice on the 10. October 1731. He used the rotational scale, developed by Mitchell and improved by Coulomb, to determine the Earth’s specific gravity to be 5.48. He died in London on the 24. February 1810

Cayley, Arthur (1821 - 1895)

Celoria, Giovanni (1842 - )

Celsius, Anders (1701 - 1744)
Anders Celsius1  is commonly known as the inventor of the thermometric scale that is based on the temperatures of ice and boiling water. In the years 1736 - 1737 he was participant on an expedition to make geographical observations in Lapland, led by Lemonnier. 1740 he founded the observatory in Uppsala, Sweden, and was it’s first director. The original building is still there, today in the centre of the town. Celsius was the first to determine the brightness of stars with instruments

Anders Celsius died on the 25. April 1744. A 36 km diameter Moon crater is named for him as well as the minor planet (4169) Celsius.
1 SuW 34 (1995), p. 267

Cerulli, Vincenzo (1859 - 1927)
V. Cerulli was born in Teramo in 1859. In 1890 he built a private observatory in his home town, equipped with a 15 inch (40 cm) Cooke refractor which he later donated to the Italian nation. From there he discovered minor planet (704) Interamnia on the 2. October 1910.

Cerulli is honoured by the Minor Planet (366) Vincentina.

Chabrol de Murol, Michel (1777 - )
M. Chabrol de Murol was born in Riom on the 18. November 1777 and worked as astronomer at the Paris observatory. He published a method to calculate eclipses. It is not known where or when he died1.
1 Pogg., Vol. 1, p. 415.

Chacornac, Jean (1823 - 1873)
J. Chacornac was born in Lyon on the 21. June 1823 and worked as assistant at the Marseille observatory and from 1854 on at the Paris observatory. He made some high quality star charts (Atlas ècliptique) and took numerous photographic plates with a telescope. The following minor planets were discovered by him: Phocaea (6. April 1853), Polyhymnia (28. October 1854), Circe (6. April 1855), Leda (12. January 1856) and Laetitia (8. February 1856). Minor Planet Massalia was independently found by him only one day after A. de Gasparis at Naples on 19. September 1952

J. Chacornac died in Lyon in September 1873. Minor Planet (1622) Chacornac is named in his honor as well as a lunar crater

Chaix, Joseph (1766 - )
Josep Chaix was born in Játiva, Valencia, in 1765 (2. February 1766?). After a basic education he turned his interests to mathematics and astronomy and travelled throughout Great Britain and France to further his studies. He participated, between 1791 and 1893, in the expedition lead by Delambre and Méchain to measure a meridian arch on the eastern Spanish coast.

In 1795 he became vice-director of the Madrid Observatory and in 1796, under Prime Minister Manuel de Godoy, supported by the founder and then director of the Madrid Obseravtory, Jiménez Coronado, he created the new degree of Cosmographic Engineer. Upon resignation of Jiménez Coronado, he was nominated his successor as director. In addition, he was commissioner of the General Inspection of Roads and Channels and chaired a department of the Roads and Channels School during the management of Agustin de Betancourt.

Chaix published several astronomical works in the magazine “Anales de Ciencias Naturales” (Annals of Natural Sciences) and he was a noticeable mathematician as well. In 1801 he published the first volume of his “Instituciones de Cálculo Diferencial e Integral” (Differential and Integral Calculation Institutions), in which, apart from a discussion on calculation principles, Chaix developed the theory of curved surfaces and curves of double curvature, as per Euler, Clairaut and Monge works and he showed an excellent knowledge of mathematical reasoning.

In 1807 he published “Memoria sobre un nuevo método general para tranformar en series las funciones trascendentes” (Memory on a new general method for transforming of trascendental functions into series), on which he used Newton’s binomial and applied only purely algebraical relations and techniques, which differenced him from developments done by Lagrange, who finally crossed and relationed the serial developments with successive derivatives of the function.

During his last days Josep Chaix lived in Valencia where he died in 1809.

Sources:
http://www.euro-senders.com/rutes/web_eng/notes/notes_meridiaverd_biografies.htm#chaix

http://www.tecnociencia.es/ventana/salas/medida/medidas_y_matematicas/libros1.htm

Thank you for translation: Julio C. Monje Bravo

Challis, James (1803 - 1862)
J. Challis was born on the 12. December 1803 in Bramtree, Essex. He was professor of astronomy at the University of Cambridge and member of the Roy. Soc. in London

Chandler, Seth Carlo (1846 - )

Chandrasekhar, S. (1910 - 1995)

Honoured by Minor Planet (1958) Chandra.

Charlier, Carl Wilhelm Ludwig (1862 - 1934)
Carl W. L. Charlier was born on the 1. April 1862 in Oestersund. He received his PhD in 1887 from the University of Upsala, Sweden, and was Professor (1927 - 1934) and director of the observatory in Lund. He received the Watson Medal in 1924 from the National Academy of Science in Washington, D.C., and the Bruce Medal in 1933 from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

C. W. L. Charlier died in Lund on the 5. November 1934. An obituary was published in the Publications of the astronomical Society of the Pacific 46 (1934), p. 367

Chazelles, Matthieu de (1657 - 1710)
M. de Chazelles was born in Lyon in 1657. He revised the works of Hipparcos, Ptolemaios and Tycho and assisted Cassini with his trigonometric work in 1683 and 1700. He died in Paris on the 16. January 1710

Chevallier, Temple (1794 - 1873)

Chicus ( - 1328)
Chicus was born in Ascoli and teached astronomy in Bologna. He wrote a commentary on the work of Sacrobosco about the heavens. Chicus was scorched in Florence in 1328, charged with witchcraft

Childrey [Childeri], Josua (1622 - 1670)
Childrey was theologican and astronomer and desribed the zodiacal light before J. D. Cassini, who mentioned it only in 1683. Childrey died in Upway in 1670

Chladni, Ernst Florenz Friedrich (1756 - 1827)
E. F. F. Chladni was born in Wittenberg in 1756. He was physicist and gave a correct description of the origin of meteorites and fireballs. He died in Breslau in 1827.

Chladni is honoured by Minor Planet (5053) Chladni and a 13 km lunar crater.

Chrisococca, Georg ( 14. Century)
Chrisococca was astronomer in Constantinople around 1350, translated Persian astronomical books to Greek and wrote a book on the Zyzygies of the Moon and the Sun and an introduction to the Persian tables

Christie, William H. M. (1845 - 1923)
Astronomer Royal (1881-1910)

Clairaut, Alexis Claude (1713 - 1765)
A. C. Clairaut was born in Paris in 1713 and worked as mathematician. He participated in the trigonometric work of Maupertuis in Lapland between 1735 and 1737. He published calculations on the orbits of the Moon and comets. He died in Paris in 1765

Clausen, Thomas (1801 - )
T. Clausen was born in Rübel in 1801 and served as director of the Dorpat observatory between 1865 and 1873. He published calculations on cometary orbits

Clavius, Christoph (1537 - 1612)
C. Clavius was born in Bamberg in 1537 and worked as mathematician. He commented an edition of Euclid’s work and wrote a textbook on Algebra in 1608. He assisted on the improvement of the calendar and died in Rome in 1612

Cleomedes (ca. 50 B.C. or later)

Clerke, Agnes Mary (1842 - 1907)

Co Cheou King (13. Century)
Co Cheou King was a Chinese astronomer around 1280 and determined the inclination of the ecliptic to be 23° 34’ 36“. He used a tube with two threads for his observations and calculated eclipses of the sun and the Moon. It is said that he had knowledge about spheric trigonometry1.
1 Ill. Lexikon der Astronomie, 1881

Coggia
Coggia was an astronomer in Marseille and discovered some comets, including one with a period of 33.6 years

Comas Solá, José [Josep] (1868 - 1937)
José Comas Solá was born in Barcelona on the 19. December 1868. He studied at the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences of the University of Barcelona and was graduated in 1889. In that year he began observing Mars and continued this through all oppositions of this planet. Comas Solá had started with astronomical observations in 1886 at the private observatory of Rafael Patxot in Sant Feliu de Guixols. As early as 1894 he produced a relief map of Mars. In an observation report in AN 152 (1900), p. 205, J. Comas Solá describes his instrument as a Grubb refractor with 6 inch (15 cm) diameter, used with a magnification of 180 times.

Extending his observations to other planets he determined the rotational period of Saturn in 1902. In the years between 1903 and 1937 he was founder and first director of the observatory Fabra that belonged to the Academy of Sciences and Arts in Barcelona, which he had joined in 1901. The observatory, located on the hill Tibidabo, was equipped in 1904 with a double refractor with 38 cm (15 inch) diameter and 6 meters and 3,8 meters focal length. The dome was mounted on a building with octagonal ground plan, to the west was added the meridian room and another tower with meteorological instruments.

Many of his works concerned the planets and comets, he even managed to discover two of the latter, the first after 300 years in Spain. During his observations he also discovered 11 new minor planets . He was the first president of the Sociedad Astrónomica de España y América and editor of the Urania (Barcelona). This society still exists and has about 760 members. It is honored by minor planet (1626) Sadeya. A list of Comas Solá’s publications are in Pogg. Vol. 6 and Vol. 7b. Most of his books show his interest in popularizing astronomy.

He died in his home town on the 2. December 1937. An obituary was published in the Pub. of the Astr. Soc. of the Pacific 50 (1938), p. 69. A picture of him is in the ‘Dic. Enciclopédico Espasa’ (Madrid, 1985, Vol. 4, p. 246). It gives his name as José Comas y Solá. He is honored by the minor planet (1655) Comas Solá and by minor planet (1102) Pepita. Both planets were discovered by him. Also a crater on Mars bears the name of this Spanish astronomer.
1 DMP, p. 149 and 207

Common, Andrew Ainslee (1841 - 1903)
A. A. Common was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne on the 7. August 1841. He received an hon, LLD in 1891 and was president of the Astron. Soc. in London in the years 1895 and 1896. He received the gold medal of this Soc. for a picture of the Great Orion Nebula

In the years 1887 until 1890 he build a reflector of 5 feet focal length for his private observatory at Eaton Rise, Ealing, London West. He also build smaller reflecting telescopes that were used to observe solar eclipses. One of his big mirrors, a 30 inch with appx. 12 feet focal length is at the Norman Lockyer Observatory. It was used by the University of Exeter for various experiments after the original Norman Lockyer Observatory had closed

A.A. Common died in London on the 2. June 1903. An obituary by Turner is published in AN 162 (1903)

Comrie, Leslie John (1983 - )
L. J. Comrie was born in Pukekohe, New Zealand, on the 15. August 1893. He worked as deputy superintendend at H. M. Nautical Almanac Office from 1930 on

Condamine, Charles Marie de la (1701 - 1774)
C. M. Condamine was born in Paris in 1701. As a physicist he assisted Bougier on his trigonometric survey between 1735 and 1744 in South America

Conon [Konon] (ca. 260 B.C.)

Cooper ()
Mr. Cooper had a private observatory at Markree in Ireland. It was there that A. Graham discovered minor planet (9) Metis on the 25. April 1848.

Cornu, Marie Alfred (1841 - )

Couder, André Joseph Alexandre (1897 - 1979)
A. J. A. Couder was born on the 27. November 1897 in Alençon. He studied in Paris in the years 1916-19 and in Strassbourg between 1922-25. From 1925 he was trainee at the observatories in Strassbourg and Paris and promoted astronomer in 1930. He received his PhD from the University of Paris in 1932. Later he got the post of director of the optical laboratory. Between 1951-53 he was member and president of the ‘Bureau des Longitudes’.

His publications1  mainly deal with optics. In 1936 he reported about the refiguring and testing of the refractor in Strassbourg and gave a general descriptions of telescopes at the Observatoire de Haute Provence.
1 A list is in Pogg.

Couteau, P. ()

Cowell, Philip Herbert (1870 - 1949)
P. H. Cowell was born in Calcutta on the 7. August 1870 as the second of five children of Herbert and Alice Cowell. After studying at Eton and Cambridge he was appointed second chief assistant at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in 1896 and, between 1910-30, superintendent at H. M. Nautical Almanac Office. Cowell invented a method for the numerical integration of the orbits of minor planets and comets, he received a hon. DSc. from Oxford.
P. H. Cowell died of cardiac asthma in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, on the 6. June 1949. He is honored by minor planet (1898) Cowell. Obituaries are in Mon. Not. RAS 110 (1949), p. 125-28 and in Nature 164 (1949), p. 133. In the Obituary Not. of Fellows of the Royal Soc., Vol. VI (1948-49), p. 374-83 is a detailled description of his life and work, plus a bibliography.

Crommelin, Andrew Claude de la Cherois (1865 - 1939)
A. C. Crommelin was born in Cushendum, Co. Antrim, Ireland, on the 6. February 1865. He was assistant at the Royal Greenwich Observatory between 1891 and 1927

Crommelin died on the 20. September 1939. Obituaries ar in Mon. Not. RAS 100 (1939/40), p. 234-26 and in Ciel et Terre 56 (1940), p. 166-68

Crosthwaite, J. ()

Cunitia, Maria (1612 - 1664)
M. Cunitia was born in Schweidnitz in 1612. She calculated astronomic tables and a description to use them in Latin and German language. She married Elias Krätschmar after 1629, but was always referred to by her maiden name1. Her husband, who later used the name Elias von Löwen, observed the planets and published a work titled ‘Horologium zodiacale etc.’ that was used to find the planets between the stars. Maria Cunita died in Pitschen in 1664.
Ill. Lexikon der Astronomie, 1881, p. 45

Curtis, Heber Doust (1872 - 1942)
Ann Arbor, USA, died 8 January 1942. Source: Himmelswelt 55 (1948).

Cusanus [Cusa, von Kues, Krebs], Nikolaus (1401 - 1464)

Cysatus, Johannes Baptista (1588 - 1657)
Cysatus was born in 1588 and worked as Professor in Ingolstadt and later as chancellor of the Jesuitical school in Luzern. He was probably the first to observe comets with a telescope and described his observations with drawings in his ‘Mathemata astronomica etc. Ingolst. 1619’. In 1631 he observed the transit of Mercury that was predicted by Kepler. Furthermore he is said to have discovered the great Orion nebula , but R. Burnham jr. in his ‘Celestial Handbook’ says that it was first seen by Nicolas Peiresc in 1611. Cysatus mentioned it in comparision of a comet in 1618.
 
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